Tuesday, January 27, 2009

The Naked Eye: Speculum Anaglyphicum



"Imagine all those girls working like mad at their looms, and think how little they were paid."

[Greta Garbo]

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N.B.: This is a combination of negative and positive mirrored anaglyphs with graded depth and projection. To see it as 3D, red and blue 3D glasses are needed, blue right, left red.

The image is also deliberately "bioptic" or "bivalent", and designed to be viewable without the 3D glasses as well.

Click on the image to see at full size.

2 comments:

Thorndike Pickledish said...

Very beautiful work--with my handy 3D glasses i see subtle depth--which I believe you were looking for ! lovely image !!

Hopalong EAC said...

Exactly, Maestro--the depth and projection is limited partly by the fact that it aims to be bioptic or bivalent, viewable with the glasses and naked eye both.

More sensational anaglyphic effects are easily done, but the resulting images don't make much sense to the naked eye.

In the old days, when we were throwing anaglyphs at one another like a food fight (you started it, hehe), you were the first to see some of the genuine artistic possibilities of anaglyphs in computer graphics--as in your dramatic stab at Picasso and your compelling, excruciatingly moving Lenny Bruce.

I remember one of yours, Monsieur, where I had to walk out to the back porch to see it, it projected so much.

There are two major ways to make anaglyphs digitally , 2D or 3D, and many combinations.

I first stumbled upon the possibility of "bioptic" when I wanted to get two distinct levels of viewing, 3D and naked eye, in an image dedicated to Zinaida Hippus, the Russian poetess, which first appeared in 2003 and was recently posted below here.

The "bioptic" thus aimed to be a fit analogue to the different levels of meaning in her poetry, which has to be, as all great poetry, looked at again and again and seen with different eyes, glassed and naked, to plumb its depths.